Situational Judgement Test (SJT)

The SJT has been designed to examine you on four of the attributes from the Pre-Registration Pharmacist Professional Attributes Framework. Watch the video below

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FAQ's

Since you will be sitting the SJT straight after your numeracy test, you will need to show the same documentation that you brought with you to sit both the numeracy test and the SJT. This is one form of original (no photocopies), valid government issued identification (ID) that includes your name, photograph and signature. The name on this ID should exactly match the first and last name you have registered with, this includes any middle name that you may have on your ID. Examples of ID’s include an international travel passport, driver’s license and identification card. The ID must be issued in the country where you are being tested in. If you do not have such an ID then you can use an international travel passport in roman characters from your country of citizenship instead.

The SJT has been designed to examine you on four of the attributes from the Pre-Registration Pharmacist Professional Attributes Framework (see Resources section). The four attributes examined in the SJT are:

 

  • Person-centred care
  • Communication and consultation skills
  • Problem solving, clinical analysis and decision making
  • Self-directed learning and motivation

The SJT helps determine how you would respond to realistic scenarios whilst working in practice. It is not there to examine your clinical decision making, it is more to test your professional judgement. Within the SJT there will be two types of response formats. The first will ask you to rank five responses in order of appropriateness in response to the scenario (1 = Most appropriate; 5 = Least appropriate). The second format will ask you to select three most appropriate actions to take (out of a total of 8) in response to the scenario.

For the first format of the SJT, where you have five responses to rank in order of appropriateness, each scenario is worth up to 20 marks, each correct response is awarded a maximum of 4 marks each. However, do not despair, if your ranking is not exactly the same as what the model answer had set, you can still be awarded marks. This can be explained better using an SJT ranking system, as shown below:

https://www.lasepharmacy.hee.nhs.uk/dyn/_assets/_folder4/_folder4/national-recruitment/preregsjtscoringguidanceforwebsite2018.pdf

So, if the ideal answer is D,C,E,A,B, a candidate who ranks the options in this order will receive 4 marks for each correct ranking, with a total of 20 marks (see the red box above). However, if a candidate ranks their options as D,A,B,E,C, they would receive a total of 12 marks (see green circles above). The left hand column indicates the ideal ranking arrangement, with the top row showing what score would be eligible for each rank from the possible five ranks. Please note, if you assign two answers with the same ranking, you will get no marks for each ranking. For the second format of the SJT, where you pick three most appropriate actions out of a total of eight, there is a maximum of 12 marks awarded for each question, with 4 marks awarded for each correct action. You will not be awarded any marks for an incorrect choice.

You will be tested on 52 scenarios.

The SJT will last for 104 minutes.

The SJT helps determine how you would respond to realistic scenarios whilst working in practice. It is not there to examine your clinical decision making, it is more to test your professional judgement. Within the SJT there will be two types of response formats. The first will ask you to rank five responses in order of appropriateness in response to the scenario (1 = Most appropriate; 5 = Least appropriate). The second format will ask you to select three most appropriate actions to take (out of a total of 8) in response to the scenario.

You must as if you are a pre-registration pharmacist on the day when responding to each scenario.

Top tips on SJTs​

Since you will be sitting the SJT straight after the numeracy test, try not to let your performance with the numeracy test affect your performance with the SJT. Leave the numeracy test behind and start fresh with the SJTs.

Practice as many SJTs as you can. Look at the thought process behind the model answer to help assist you when deciding on your answer. If your University is running a ProPharmace Oriel Workshop, make the most of practice questions provided.

Look through the four attributes that will be assessed from the Pre-Registration Pharmacist Professional Attributes Framework and think of possible SJT questions that may come up.

Familiarise yourself very well with the Pre-Registration Pharmacist Professional Attributes Framework, so that you are able to look at the SJT and determine which attribute is being assessed. This may help you answer the questions correctly

When answering the first format of the SJT, it will be easier to start by picking which is clearly the best action to take and which is the worst action to take. This then means you can then work through three other options to determine the correct rank.

Remember you are answering the SJT as a pre-registration trainee pharmacist, so bear in mind what tasks you should be able to do at that level and what tasks you may need to refer to the pharmacist. It would be good to familiarise yourself with the GPhC pre-registration manual

Practice time management and pacing yourself through the SJTs. 52 scenarios are a lot to look through in 104 minutes, leaving only 2 minutes per question, so you have to make your decisions efficiently and quickly. If you get stuck on a question, flag it and come back to it. Ideally you should try and spend less than 2 minutes per question to allow time for you to come back and double check questions that you may have found difficult.

Take each question as it comes, and do not let one difficult question affect the rest of your performance.

Practice time management and pacing yourself through the SJTs. 52 scenarios are a lot to look through in 104 minutes, leaving only 2 minutes per question, so you have to make your decisions efficiently and quickly. If you get stuck on a question, flag it and come back to it. Ideally you should try and spend less than 2 minutes per question to allow time for you to come back and double check questions that you may have found difficult.

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